Let’s learn some words, shall we?

Happy Birthday Noah Webster, aka Father of the American Dictionary. Dictionaries are crazy things, there are so many words in that huge book that I can’t pronounce, can’t define, or can’t even tell if it’s English or not. However, as a writer, something I should always be doing is expanding my vocabulary. It’s only fitting that I do this on National Dictionary Day.

Here are 10 words I didn’t know the meaning to but now do. I also chose words I can most likely remember to use here and add to my everyday vernacular. Let’s do this.

  1. Lavation– (lay-VAY-shun) | noun *October 16th Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day*
    1. Definition: the act or an instance of washing or cleansing
    2. Examples: “In Maycomb County, it was easy to tell when someone bathed regularly, as opposed to yearly lavations….”
  2. Odious (o-dee-us) | adjective
    1. Definition: arousing or deserving hatred or repugnance : hateful
    2. Example: Volunteers gathered on Saturday morning to scrub away the odious graffiti spray-painted on the school.
  3. Guerdon (gur-dun) |  noun
    1. Definition: reward, recompense
    2. Example: “The big hurdle … was early promotion to captain. … This early promotion, this small dry irrevocable statistic in the record, was his guerdon for a quarter of a century of getting things done.
  4. Macadam (muh-KAD-um) | noun *only chose this word because my backyard has a macadam*
    1. Definition: a roadway or pavement of small closely packed broken stone
    2. Example:The sloping, curved street saw light traffic and had a smooth macadam surface that made it popular with skateboarders.
  5. Impavid (im-pavdid) | adjective
    1. Definition: Fearless
    2. Example: Giant by thine own nature, Thou art beautiful, thou art strong, an impavid colossus,And thy future mirrors that greatness.
  6. Belgard (bell-guard) | noun
    1. Definition: A loving look
    2. Example: She left me a belgard from across the room.
  7.  Druthers (druhth-erz) | noun
    1. Definition: one’s own way
    2. Example: If I had my druthers, I’d sleep all day.
  8. Invective (in-VEK-tiv) | noun
    1. Definition: abusive language
    2. Example: … the explosive role that social media has assumed in this campaign have made for a nasty brew of invective, slurs and accusations….
  9.  Haimish (hey-mish) | adjective
    1. Definition: (slang) cozy and unpretentious
    2. Example: … you would like the candle-lit dining room (below), formerly a watchmaker’s shop, where there are perhaps a dozen tables, a fish tank, and murky paintings–all of which contribute to an ambiance best described as Transylvanian haimish.
  10. Bon Mot (bon moh) | noun
    1. Definition: a witty remark or comment; clever saying
    2. Example: He was an extrovert and a character, again like his mother, with a knack for tossing off the perfect bon mot. Once at a dinner party, he told his seat mate, “We are all worms. But I do believe that I am a glow-worm.”

 

I hope you all learned something from these, because I definitely did. Keep an eye out and see if you see me use these in a post in the future 😉

Alicia

 

 

2 thoughts on “Let’s learn some words, shall we?

  1. Chris Marquez says:

    Hello! First and foremost I wanted to tell you thank you for checking out my poetry and my latest blog post about surviving my drug overdose. I try to consistently add content to my blog even if it is painful at times to do and I like to engage my readers the best way possible. I don’t want to seem spammy but I wanted to introduce myself and tell you that as someone who is barely starting to grow and nurture their blog, your likes truly mean the world to me. It means so much that someone I don’t even know took it in their heart to read about my struggles. It is comforting and so tremendously healing for my spirit. I loved your post about learning new words too! Makes me want to pick up some vocabulary books and learn a few myself. Anyway, I look forward to reading more from you. Don’t be a stranger!

    – Christopher Michael Marquez

    Liked by 2 people

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